CME for Physicians
CNE for Nurses
CPE for Pharmacists
CANCER EDUCATION FOR PHYSICIANS, NURSES, AND PHARMACISTS - Taught by the Experts

Co-Chairs

Paul A. Bunn MD
Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
Distinguished Professor
James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research
Professor, Medical Oncology
University of Colorado Denver
Denver, CO
 
Roy S. Herbst MD, PhD
Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research
Translational Research Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT
 
12th Annual Symposium on Personalized Therapies and Best Clinical Practices for Lung Cancer and Head & Neck Cancer

Agenda

Registration and Buffet Breakfast
7:00AM
Registration and Buffet Breakfast
8:00AM
Welcome, Introductions and CME/CE Baseline Pre-Test
Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
Session 1: Immune Checkpoint Inhibition as First-Line Therapy for Improving Outcome in NSCLC
8:10AM
DEBATE #1: For a PS2 NSCLC patient with a PD-L1 level>1 what regimen do you use?
  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibition (ICI) plus either chemotherapy or anti-VEGFR therapy
  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibition (ICI) monotherapy

Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
8:30AM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
8:40AM
Immune Therapy Plus Chemotherapy as Initial Therapy for NON-SQUAMOUS NSCLC without an Actionable Mutation
9:00AM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
9:10AM
Immune Therapy Plus Chemotherapy as Initial Therapy for SQUAMOUS NSCLC without an Actionable Mutation
Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD
9:30AM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
9:40AM
SINGLE-AGENT Immune Therapy as Initial Therapy for NSCLC without an Actionable Mutation
10:00AM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
10:10AM
BREAK
10:30AM
DEBATE #2:
  • For initial therapy of my EGFR-mutation-positive NSCLC patients I use an EGFR TKI as monotherapy.
  • For initial therapy my EGFR-mutation-positive NSCLC patients I use an EGFR TKI plus an anti VEGFR inhibitor or plus chemotherapy.

10:50AM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
SESSION #2 EGFR-Positive NSCLC – Personalizing Therapies for the Common EGFR Mutations to Improve Outcome
11:00AM
Strategies for EGFR-Mutation-Positive NSCLC in the First-Line and Also in Subsequent Lines of Therapy
11:20AM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
SESSION #3 ALK-Positive and ROS1-Positive NSCLC – Improving Outcome with Personalized Therapeutic Strategies
11:30AM
Strategies for ALK-Mutation-Positive and ROS-1-Mutation-Positive-NSCLC in the First-line and in Subsequent Lines of Therapy
11:50AM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
LUNCH with the PROFESSORS: 3 Options for Educational Sessions
12:00PM
Biosimilars for Oncology
12:00PM
Optimizing the Impact on Quality of Life with Long-Term Therapy for Lung Cancer: Measures to Assist with Patient Preferences, Tolerability, Needs and Preferences in Lung Cancer Drug Therapy Selection
12:00PM
Managing Immune Therapy irAEs in NSCLC patients: What nurses must know
SESSION #4 Locally-Advanced NSCLC: Developments with Checkpoint Inhibition to Improve Outcome in Unresectable Disease
1:00PM
Locally-Advanced (Stage III) Unresectable NSCLC: Strategies with Immune Therapy
1:20PM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
SESSION #5 New & Emerging UNCOMMON Actionable Alterations in NSCLC to Improve Outcome
1:30PM
Molecular Diagnostic Testing in NSCLC for Actionable Alterations (Mutations; Fusions)
2:00PM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
2:10PM
FDA-Approved Drugs, Investigational Agents & Molecular Testing for Relatively Uncommon NSCLC Actionable Alterations
2:30PM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
2:40PM
FDA Approved Drugs Used Investigationally & Molecular Testing for Relatively Uncommon NSCLC Actionable Alterations
3:00PM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
3:10PM
BREAK
SESSION #6 HEAD & NECK Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cancer: A Focus on Immune Therapy for improving Outcome
3:30PM
Advanced HEAD & NECK Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Immune Checkpoint Inhibition Strategies for Across All Lines of Therapy
3:50PM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
SESSION #7 Small Cell Lung Cancer: A New Era of Improving Outcome with New & Emerging Therapeutic Strategies
4:00PM
First-Line Therapy for ES-SCLC: Immune Checkpoint Inhibition
4:20PM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
4:30PM
Second-Line &Third-Line Therapies for ES-SCLC: Chemotherapy, Novel Therapies & Immune Therapy; and Therapies for LS-SCLC
4:50PM
Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
5:00PM
CME/CE Post Test and ADJOURN

Overview

The purpose of this one-day CME/CE/MOC-certified Saturday symposium is to provide an objective, fair-balanced, evidenced-based, unbiased, comprehensive clinical update on lung cancer and head and neck cancer, presenting the most important practical clinical information that medical oncologists, and other HealthCare Practitioners (HCPs) treating NSCLC and SCLC, and metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head & Neck (SCCHNC) need to know to improve patient outcome. The August 29, 2020 date was selected to immediately follow the annual meeting of the World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Singapore held two weeks earlier; and it follows by ten weeks, the annual May/June 2020 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

Educational Need

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and in many other countries, and, remains a significant unmet medical need. In 2019, an estimated 246,440 adults in the US were diagnosed with lung cancer. And in 2019, an estimated 147,510 people died in the US from all lung cancers.

NSCLC represents about approximately 85% of all lung cancers. Overall survival rates for NSCLC patients vary widely depending upon the stage of the lung malignancy when it is initially diagnosed. Five-year overall survival rates are approximately 16% for men and 21% for women. The five-year survival rate for Stage I NSCLC is approximately 50 percent. Perhaps more importantly, because most lung cancers are diagnosed at late stages of disease, the five-year survival rate for Stage 4 (advanced, metastatic) NSCLC is approximately a dismal two percent. Nonsquamous NSCLC accounts for about 70 to 80% of NSCLC. Squamous non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 20 to 30% of all lung cancers and is associated with shorter survival than is nonsquamous NSCLC.

SCLC represents about approximately 10% to 15% of all lung cancers, or approximately 30,000 people who will be diagnosed with this malignancy in 2018. Approximately 70% of the SCLC patients present with stage IV disease, where the treatment approach is palliative. Although SCLC is more responsive to chemotherapy and radiation therapy than other types of lung cancer, its prognosis is the poorest among all histological types of lung cancer, with an overall dismal survival rate at 5 years of only between 2 and 5%. Smoking is the primary cause of this tumor type, with 90% of SCLC arising in current or former smokers.

Locally-advanced NSCLC makes up about 30-35% of the NSCLC patient population. STAGE III NSCLC is most commonly treated with multimodality therapy, including chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. When surgical resection is not feasible for stage III disease, the standard treatment includes concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Despite improvements in survival using concurrent therapy over radiation therapy alone or sequential chemoradiation therapy, the median survival remained less than 2 years. Head and neck cancer (HNC) accounts for about 4% of all cancers in the United States. An estimated 64,690 people (47,650 men and 17,040 women) will develop HNC this year alone. While younger people can develop the disease, most people are older than age 50 years when they are diagnosed. Approximately 13,740 deaths (10,250 men and 3490 women) from HNC will occur this year. The lack of effective treatment strategies for lung cancer and head and neck cancer has remained an unmet medical need.

During the past several years, meaningful continued incremental advances and developments with immune checkpoint inhibition, and, with targeted therapies, especially with newer-generation EGFR and ALK/ROS1 TKIs, and most recently, with the ability to detect and treat uncommon actionable molecular alterations with newer TKIs and drugs as well as with investigational use of FDA drugs approved for non-thoracic indications, (using advanced NGS molecular testing in tissue and plasma) such as NTRK, RET, MET, EGFR/HER2 exon 20 insertions, HER3, KRAS G12, BRAF and EGFR exon 14 skipping mutations, have continued to gradually improve NSCLC, SCLC outcomes, and using immune therapy for improving SCCHN patient outcomes. The most important recent data regarding these clinical advancements are reported here.


Target Audience

Community-based and academic oncologists, oncology nurses, oncology Nurse Practitioners, oncology pharmacists, oncology Physician Assistants, pulmonologists, pathologists and oncology fellows and other HCPs involved in the diagnosis, development of patients with NSCLC, SCLC and SCCHN.

Learning Objectives

Physician
  1. Understand how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for treatment-naïve patients who have actionable mutations with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).
  2. Compare and contrast the various immune therapy and chemotherapy options in treatment-naïve NSCLC without actionable mutations in patients with high, low or no expression of PD-L1.
  3. Compare and contrast the immune therapy options for treating patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC in both the treatment naïve and salvage settings regardless of PD-L1 expression or TPS scores.
  4. Understand how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for patients with SCLC in the treatment-naïve and salvage settings.
  5. Evaluate when to order NGS testing for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC, including for those patients with EGFR mutations, ALK, ROS1 rearrangements and the new and emerging actionable driver mutations.
  6. Compare and Contrast Molecular Testing Methodologies for NSCLC and SCLC including tissue-based and plasma-based (liquid biopsy) tests.
  7. Evaluate the scenarios for when, if ever, to temporarily discontinue, and when to resume immune therapy in a NSCLC patient that is responding to therapy.
  8. Compare and contrast the new FDA-approved and emerging immune therapies, targeted therapies and combinations with and without chemotherapy for unresectable, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the Head & Neck (SCCHN).
  9. Evaluate the large number of open clinical trials offering various combinations of immune and targeted therapies for NSCLC, SCLC, and SCCHN as possible options for enrolling eligible patients to possibly improve outcome.
  10. Compare and contrast the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an EGFR-directed TKI therapy across all lines of therapy.
  11. Compare and contrast the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an ALK-directed TKI therapy across all lines of therapy.
  12. Understand how to apply the various sequencing strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR TKI and anti-ALK TKI therapy, including when to use the most effective of the three generations of EGFR-directed and ALK-directed TKI therapies “up front” versus saving them for salvage therapy.
  13. Analyze the various strategies for treating new and emerging uncommon actionable molecular alterations (mutations and fusions) in NSCLC including NTRK, ROS1, RET, MET exon 14 skipping mutations, EGFR HER2 exon 20 insertion mutations, HER3, KRAS G12, and BRAF.
  14. Compare and contrast the various molecular testing strategies for detecting new and emerging uncommon actionable molecular alterations (mutations and fusions) in NSCLC including NTRK, ROS1, RET, MET exon 14 skipping mutations, EGFR HER2 exon 20 insertion mutations, HER3, KRAS G12, and BRAF.
  15. Understand the current clinical data on the use of immune therapy for unresectable, metastatic locally-advanced Stage III NSCLC.
  16. Analyze the various predictive and prognostic markers including PD-L1, Tumor Mutation Burden (TMB) and smoking history for patients with NSCLC and SCLC.
  17. Identify opportunities and how to incorporate patient assessment tools such as PROs and QOL in treatment planning for NSCLC and SCLC patients.
  18. Evaluate the opportunities to address and utilize the National Quality Strategy and Quality Improvement in treatment planning for NSCLC, SCLC, and SCCHN patients.
Nurse
  1. Describe how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for treatment-naïve patients who have actionable mutations with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).
  2. Recall the various immune therapy and chemotherapy options in treatment-naïve NSCLC without actionable mutations in patients with high, low or no expression of PD-L1.
  3. Describe the immune therapy options for treating patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC in both the treatment naïve and salvage settings regardless of PD-L1 expression or TPS scores.
  4. Understand how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for patients with SCLC in the treatment-naïve and salvage settings.
  5. Describe when to order NGS testing for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC, including for those patients with EGFR mutations, ALK, ROS1 rearrangements and the new and emerging actionable driver mutations.
  6. Analyze the Molecular Testing Methodologies for NSCLC and SCLC including tissue-based and plasma-based (liquid biopsy) tests.
  7. Identify the scenarios for when, if ever, to temporarily discontinue, and when to resume immune therapy in a NSCLC patient that is responding to therapy.
  8. Compare and contrast the new FDA-approved and emerging immune therapies, targeted therapies and combinations with and without chemotherapy for unresectable, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the Head & Neck (SCCHN).
  9. List the large number of open clinical trials offering various combinations of immune and targeted therapies for NSCLC, SCLC, and SCCHN as possible options for enrolling eligible patients to possibly improve outcome.
  10. Recall the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an EGFR-directed TKI therapy across all lines of therapy.
  11. Recall the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an ALK-directed TKI therapy across all lines of therapy.
  12. Describe the various sequencing strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR TKI and anti-ALK TKI therapy, including when to use the most effective of the three generations of EGFR-directed and ALK-directed TKI therapies “up front” versus saving them for salvage therapy.
  13. Describe the various strategies for treating new and emerging uncommon actionable molecular alterations (mutations and fusions) in NSCLC including NTRK, ROS1, RET, MET exon 14 skipping mutations, EGFR HER2 exon 20 insertion mutations, HER3, KRAS G12, and BRAF.
  14. Analyze the various molecular testing strategies for detecting new and emerging uncommon actionable molecular alterations (mutations and fusions) in NSCLC including NTRK, ROS1, RET, MET exon 14 skipping mutations, EGFR HER2 exon 20 insertion mutations, HER3, KRAS G12, and BRAF.
  15. Analyze the current clinical data on the use of immune therapy for unresectable, metastatic locally-advanced Stage III NSCLC.
  16. List the various predictive and prognostic markers including PD-L1, Tumor Mutation Burden (TMB) and smoking history for patients with NSCLC and SCLC.
  17. Describe the opportunities and how to incorporate patient assessment tools such as PROs and QOL in treatment planning for NSCLC and SCLC patients.
  18. Recall the opportunities to address and utilize the National Quality Strategy and Quality Improvement in treatment planning for NSCLC, SCLC and SCCHN patients.
Pharmacist
  1. Describe how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for treatment-naïve patients who have actionable mutations with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).
  2. Recall the various immune therapy and chemotherapy options in treatment-naïve NSCLC without actionable mutations in patients with high, low or no expression of PD-L1.
  3. Describe the immune therapy options for treating patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC in both the treatment naïve and salvage settings regardless of PD-L1 expression or TPS scores.
  4. Understand how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for patients with SCLC in the treatment-naïve and salvage settings.
  5. Describe when to order NGS testing for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC, including for those patients with EGFR mutations, ALK, ROS1 rearrangements and the new and emerging actionable driver mutations.
  6. Analyze the Molecular Testing Methodologies for NSCLC and SCLC including tissue-based and plasma-based (liquid biopsy) tests.
  7. Identify the scenarios for when, if ever, to temporarily discontinue, and when to resume immune therapy in a NSCLC patient that is responding to therapy.
  8. Compare and contrast the new FDA-approved and emerging immune therapies, targeted therapies and combinations with and without chemotherapy for unresectable, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the Head & Neck (SCCHN).
  9. List the large number of open clinical trials offering various combinations of immune and targeted therapies for NSCLC, SCLC, and SCCHN as possible options for enrolling eligible patients to possibly improve outcome.
  10. Recall the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an EGFR-directed TKI therapy across all lines of therapy.
  11. Recall the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an ALK-directed TKI therapy across all lines of therapy.
  12. Describe the various sequencing strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR TKI and anti-ALK TKI therapy, including when to use the most effective of the three generations of EGFR-directed and ALK-directed TKI therapies “up front” versus saving them for salvage therapy.
  13. Describe the various strategies for treating new and emerging uncommon actionable molecular alterations (mutations and fusions) in NSCLC including NTRK, ROS1, RET, MET exon 14 skipping mutations, EGFR HER2 exon 20 insertion mutations, HER3, KRAS G12, and BRAF.
  14. Analyze the various molecular testing strategies for detecting new and emerging uncommon actionable molecular alterations (mutations and fusions) in NSCLC including NTRK, ROS1, RET, MET exon 14 skipping mutations, EGFR HER2 exon 20 insertion mutations, HER3, KRAS G12, and BRAF.
  15. Analyze the current clinical data on the use of immune therapy for unresectable, metastatic locally-advanced Stage III NSCLC.
  16. List the various predictive and prognostic markers including PD-L1, Tumor Mutation Burden (TMB) and smoking history for patients with NSCLC and SCLC.
  17. Describe the opportunities and how to incorporate patient assessment tools such as PROs and QOL in treatment planning for NSCLC and SCLC patients.
  18. Recall the opportunities to address and utilize the National Quality Strategy and Quality Improvement in treatment planning for NSCLC, SCLC and SCCHN patients.

CME/CE Accreditation and Credit Designation

Physicians

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this live activity for a maximum of 8.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Maintenance of Certification Part II

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 8.25 MOC points in the American Board of Internal medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider's responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

Nurses

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 8.25 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Pharmacists

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN:
Credits: 8.25 hours (0.825 ceu)
Type of Activity:

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Other

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 8.25 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.


Activity Location

Hotel TBD

Los Angeles, CA

 

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to companies providing support for this independent educational activity.

AstraZeneca
Additional commercial support pending