Virtual Education Corner

CANCER EDUCATION FOR PHYSICIANS (CME), NURSES (CNE), AND PHARMACISTS (CPE) - Taught by the Experts

Chair

D. Ross Camidge MD, PhD
D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD
Professor, Medicine-Medical Oncology
Joyce Zeff Chair in Lung Cancer Research
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Anschutz Medical Campus
University of Colorado Cancer Center
Aurora, CO
 

Faculty

Shirish Madhav Gadgeel MD
Shirish Madhav Gadgeel, MD
Professor of Medicine
Division Chief Hematology & Oncology
Henry Ford Cancer Institute
Henry Ford Hospital
Detroit, MI
 
Justin F Gainor MD
Justin F Gainor, MD
Harvard Medical School
Assistant in Medicine
Attending Physician, Thoracic Oncology
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, MA
 
Richard  Gralla MD, FACP
Richard Gralla, MD, FACP
Professor of Medicine
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Jacobi Medical Center
Bronx, New York
 
Optimizing Outcome in ALK-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Using Precision Medicine & Patient Assessments for Personalized First-Line ALK-Targeted Therapy

Agenda

Live Virtual Internet Video Broadcast
4:30PM
Welcome & Audience Survey
D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD
4:35PM
MODULE 1. "Lessons Learned" from First- and Second-Line ALK-Positive NSCLC Clinical Trials: Systemic Efficacy, and Efficacy Controlling CNS Disease, Using ALK TKIs
Shirish Madhav Gadgeel, MD
4:55PM
MODULE 2. Advances in Molecular Testing for ALK Gene Fusions, and Understanding Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK TKIs in ALK-Positive NSCLC
Justin F Gainor, MD
5:15PM
Interactive Panel Discussion & Audience Q&A
D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD
5:25PM
MODULE 3. Patient ALK TKI Tolerability, Patient Needs and Preferences in ALK-Positive NSCLC: Optimizing the Impact on Quality of Life with Long-Term, Daily, TKI Therapy, Using Personalized First-Line Treatment Plans
Richard Gralla, MD, FACP
5:45PM
Interactive Panel Discussion & Audience Q&A
D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD
6:00PM
MODULE 4. "Putting it all Together" Consolidating Systemic and CNS Efficacy & Safety Evidence, Mechanisms of Resistance, Biomarker Testing, and, Patient Needs and Preferences with ALK-TKIs, to Devise Optimal, Chronic First-Line ALK TKI Therapy in ALK-Positive-NSCLC
D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD
6:15PM
Interactive Panel Discussion & Audience Q&A
D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD
6:30PM
Concluding Remarks, Audience Survey and Adjourn
D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD

Overview

This activity has been designed with the assistance of the four expert faculty members and of our BMLI Lung Cancer Planning Committee to help the target audience overcome key challenges and issues involved with devising the optimal treatment plans with ALK TKIs for ALK-positive NSCLC in the first-line setting. It is also intended to help the target audience close personal Quality Performance Practice Gaps while considering a number of critical treatment decision-making factors that have been identified in this Needs Assessment, including systemic efficacy, CNS efficacy, mechanisms of resistance, and molecular testing with ALK TKIs, and, patient needs, patient lifestyles and tolerability with daily, chronic ALK TKI therapy, towards the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes through improved performance-in-practice by the target audience.

Educational Need

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and in many other countries, and, remains a significant unmet medical need. In 2019, an estimated 246,440 adults in the US will be diagnosed with lung cancer. And in 2019, an estimated 147,510 people will die in the US from all lung cancers. NSCLC represents about approximately 85% of all lung cancers. Overall survival rates for NSCLC patients vary widely depending upon the stage of the lung malignancy when it is initially diagnosed. Five-year overall survival rates are approximately 16% for men and 21% for women. The five-year survival rate for Stage I NSCLC is approximately 50 percent. Perhaps more importantly, because most lung cancers are diagnosed at late stages of disease, the five-year survival rate for Stage 4 (advanced, metastatic) NSCLC is approximately a dismal two percent. This malignancy is expected to remain a major clinical and scientific challenge for the foreseeable future. And the lack of an effective, long-term, chronic treatment plan for preventing the development of Acquired Resistance to ALK TKIs is an unmet medical need. Nevertheless, during the past several years, meaningful incremental advances and developments with targeted therapies, especially newer-generation ALK TKIs, have continued to gradually improve NSCLC patient outcomes for patients with ALK-gene fusion rearrangements. Important outcome improvements have been made with systemic efficacy and CNS efficacy and CNS control of ALK-positive NSCLC.

Significant outcome improvements have been made with Quality of Life and therapy tolerability factors for patients on chronic ALK TKIs. Lessening many of the common side effects of ALK TKI therapy that affect patient lifestyle factors such as nausea, vomiting and constipation has become increasingly important, especially as more effective ALK TKIs have prolonged survival and newer ALK TKIs have made common side effects that often occur on a daily basis, a major decision-making factor in ALK TKI therapy selection, as patients are living for extended periods of time. But there remains an unmet medical and clinical need for developing strategies to integrate patient needs, preferences, lifestyles and tolerability for ALK TKIs used in the first-line and subsequent ALK-positive-NSCLC settings. All of these ALK TKI efficacy and safety advances and developments, especially the improved development of systemic and CNS control, and, the more tolerable patient profiles of newer ALK TKIs, have helped facilitate the optimal selection of ALK TKIs for first-line use in ALK-positive NSCLC by providing more choices to clinicians. And one of the most promising benefits of next-generation ALK TKIs is the possibility that switching targeted agents may be a reasonable alternative to local CNS control therapies due to the high CNS efficacy with newer ALK TKIs. However, prospective data are needed to determine which strategy offers the best OS, intracranial control rate, quality of life and therapeutic ratio, taking into account the number of BM and whether patients are symptomatic at the time of progression.


Target Audience

The primary target audience includes both academic and community-based oncologists and pulmonologists, and the secondary and tertiary target audience includes pathologists, pharmacists, NPs and Pas involved in the diagnosis, development of first-line treatment plans and the care of NSCLC patients with ALK-gene fusion rearrangements.

Learning Objectives

Physician
  1. Compare and contrast the systemic and CNS efficacy data, and, side effect profiles of the current and emerging ALK TKIs across all lines of therapy to assist in the development of the optimal first-line ALK TKI therapy for ALK-positive NSCLC.
  2. Understand the importance of knowing the different patients’ needs, perspectives, lifestyles and tolerability for ALK TKI therapy, and, the physician preferences for selecting ALK TKIs in first-line therapy for long-term, daily use in ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC.
  3. Analyze the mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK TKIs and their implications on selecting optimal first-line ALK TKI therapy for metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC.
  4. Understand the clinical applications and benefits of using NGS ctDNA and cfDNA testing for detecting ALK-gene fusions in treatment-naïve metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC patients.
  5. Devise the optimal first-line ALK-TKI treatment plans for ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients based upon systemic efficacy, CNS efficacy, adverse events to ALK TKIs, personalized patient tolerability profiles, patient needs and preferences, physician preferences, and, the type of ALK fusion variant.
Nurse
  1. Describe the systemic and CNS efficacy data, and, side effect profiles of the current and emerging ALK TKIs across all lines of therapy to assist in the development of the optimal first-line ALK TKI therapy for ALK-positive NSCLC.
  2. Recognize the importance of knowing the different patients’ needs, perspectives, lifestyles and tolerability for ALK TKI therapy, and, the physician preferences for selecting ALK TKIs in first-line therapy for long-term, daily use in ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC.
  3. List the mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK TKIs and their implications on selecting optimal first-line ALK TKI therapy for metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC.
  4. Identify the clinical applications and benefits of using NGS ctDNA and cfDNA testing for detecting ALK-gene fusions in treatment-naïve metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC patients.
  5. Recall how to develop the optimal first-line ALK-TKI treatment plans for ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients based upon systemic efficacy, CNS efficacy, adverse events to ALK TKIs, personalized patient tolerability profiles, patient needs and preferences, physician preferences, and, the type of ALK fusion variant.
Pharmacist
  1. Describe the systemic and CNS efficacy data, and, side effect profiles of the current and emerging ALK TKIs across all lines of therapy to assist in the development of the optimal first-line ALK TKI therapy for ALK-positive NSCLC.
  2. Recognize the importance of knowing the different patients’ needs, perspectives, lifestyles and tolerability for ALK TKI therapy, and, the physician preferences for selecting ALK TKIs in first-line therapy for long-term, daily use in ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC.
  3. List the mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK TKIs and their implications on selecting optimal first-line ALK TKI therapy for metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC.
  4. Identify the clinical applications and benefits of using NGS ctDNA and cfDNA testing for detecting ALK-gene fusions in treatment-naïve metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC patients.
  5. Recall how to develop the optimal first-line ALK-TKI treatment plans for ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients based upon systemic efficacy, CNS efficacy, adverse events to ALK TKIs, personalized patient tolerability profiles, patient needs and preferences, physician preferences, and, the type of ALK fusion variant.

CME/CE Accreditation and Credit Designation

Evaluation Forms and the Knowledge Test for this Activity

To access the Evaluation Form and Knowledge Test please click on this URL link: ASCO May 31 Eval form: https://bmli.typeform.com/to/jzbgAf

Physicians

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this live activity for a maximum of 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Maintenance of Certification Part 2

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 2 MOC points in the American Board of Internal medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider's responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

Nurses

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 2 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Pharmacists

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-20-001-L01-P
Credits: 2 hours (0.2 ceu)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Other

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 2 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.


Activity Location

 

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to companies providing support for this independent educational activity.

Takeda Oncology
Xcovery Holdings, Inc.