Virtual Education Corner

CANCER EDUCATION FOR PHYSICIANS (CME), NURSES (CNE), AND PHARMACISTS (CPE) - Taught by the Experts

Chair

Giorgio V. Scagliotti MD, PhD
Giorgio V. Scagliotti, MD, PhD
Professor of Oncology
Chief, Medical Oncology Division
Saint Luigi Hospital
Head of the Department of Oncology
University of Torino
Torino, Italy
Disclosures
Consulting Fees (e.g., advisory boards): Astrazeneca, Roche, Pfizer, Takeda, MSD, Janssen
Fees for Non-CME/CE Services Received Directly from Commercial Interest or their Agents (e.g., speakers’ bureaus): Astrazeneca, Roche, MSD
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.
 

Faculty

Christine M. Lovly MD, PhD
Christine M. Lovly, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine,
Ingram Associate Professor of Cancer Research
Co-Leader, Translational Research and Interventional Oncology Program
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, TN
Disclosures
Consulting Fees (e.g., advisory boards): Takeda, Syros, Achilles, Foundation Medicine, Astra Zeneca, Genentech, Lilly, Pfizer, Blueprints Medicine
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.
 
Joel  Neal MD, PhD
Joel Neal, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Division of Oncology
Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford Clinical Cancer Center
Stanford, CA
Disclosures
Consulting Fees (e.g., advisory boards): Amgen, AstraZeneca, Calithera Biosciences, Eli Lilly and Company, Exelixis, Genentech/Roche, Iovance Biotherapeutics, Jounce Therapeutics, Takeda Pharmaceuticals
Contracted Research: Adaptimmune, Boehringer Ingelheim, Exelixis, Genentech/Roche, GSK, Merck, Nektar Therapeutics, Novartis, Takeda Pharmaceuticals
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.
 
Nathan A. Pennell MD, PhD
Nathan A. Pennell, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University
Co-Director, Cleveland Clinic Lung Cancer Program
Deputy Vice Chair of Clinical Research
Taussig Cancer Institute
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland OH
Disclosures
Consulting Fees (e.g., advisory boards): Astrazeneca, Merck, BMS, Eli Lilly, Genentech, Amgen
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.
 
Zofia  Piotrowska MD
Zofia Piotrowska, MD
Assistant Professor
Medical Oncology
Harvard Medical School
Attending Thoracic Medical Oncologist
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, MA
Disclosures
Consulting Fees (e.g., advisory boards): Genentech, InCyte, Eli Lilly, AstraZeneca
Contracted Research: Novartis, Takeda, Spectrum, AstraZeneca, Tesara, Cullinan-Pearl
I intend to reference unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in my presentation.
 
The Expanding Number of Actionable Driver Mutations for NSCLC. How are They Revealed by Current & Emerging Molecular Tests? What are Their Standards of Care and Other Treatment Options?
The Expanding Number of Actionable Driver Mutations for NSCLC. How are They Revealed by Current & Emerging Molecular Tests? What are Their Standards of Care and Other Treatment Options?
Start Date: 09/15/2020
Date Expires: 09/15/2021

Agenda

Interactive Webcast
Guidelines and Challenges for Molecular Testing in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Patients: Navigating the Expanding Testing Landscape in Pursuit of Optimal Therapies and Outcome
Nathan A. Pennell, MD, PhD
Expert Panel Discussion #1
Joel Neal, MD, PhD
Giorgio V. Scagliotti, MD, PhD
Christine M. Lovly, MD, PhD
Nathan A. Pennell, MD, PhD
Zofia Piotrowska, MD
Liquid Biopsy Testing in Newly-Diagnosed NSCLC and in Detecting Acquired Resistance: Understanding Its Clinical Applications for Selecting Therapies that Achieve Optimal Outcome
Christine M. Lovly, MD, PhD
Expert Panel Discussion #2
Joel Neal, MD, PhD
Giorgio V. Scagliotti, MD, PhD
Christine M. Lovly, MD, PhD
Nathan A. Pennell, MD, PhD
Zofia Piotrowska, MD
Molecular Testing to Select First-Line and Salvage Targeted Therapy in NSCLC with EGFR, ALK, ROS1 and BRAF Actionable Driver Mutations to Improve Patient Outcome
Zofia Piotrowska, MD
Expert Panel Discussion #3
Joel Neal, MD, PhD
Giorgio V. Scagliotti, MD, PhD
Christine M. Lovly, MD, PhD
Nathan A. Pennell, MD, PhD
Zofia Piotrowska, MD
Molecular Testing to Select First-Line and Salvage Targeted Therapy to Optimize Outcome in Patients with Uncommon Actionable NSCLC Driver Mutations: NTRK, MET, RET, KRAS, HER2, Exon 20 and Other Uncommon EGFR Alterations: Benefits of Using Testing and Therapy Protocols Personalized for Your Institution
Joel Neal, MD, PhD
Expert Panel Discussion #4
Joel Neal, MD, PhD
Giorgio V. Scagliotti, MD, PhD
Christine M. Lovly, MD, PhD
Nathan A. Pennell, MD, PhD
Zofia Piotrowska, MD

Overview

The overall objective of this activity is to prepare the lung cancer community to help close many critically important Quality Performance Practice Gaps that affect all newly-diagnosed NSCLC patients by providing: 1) an improved understanding of the large number of current, emerging and evolving molecular tests for all treatment-naïve NSCLC patients, 2) knowing the corresponding FDA standards of care for all of the NSCLC driver mutations detected by these tests, 3) knowing the corresponding NGS tissue and liquid biopsy tests for newly-diagnosed NSCLC patients without mutations, and, their therapeutic standards of care options with checkpoint inhibition therapies, and, 4) understanding how to use molecular diagnostic tests to select the optimal investigational therapies in clinical trials, and, how to use FDA-approved drugs as “investigational agents” for the newly-diagnosed NSCLC patients with uncommon driver mutations, and, for the very large number of NSCLC patients without mutations, in order to produce better patient outcomes.

Educational Need

The number of driver mutations in NSCLC has been continually expanding beyond the traditional molecular alterations such as EGFR, ALK & ROS1. Today, these driver mutations and alterations include NTRK, MET exon 14, KRAS, RET, HER2, BRAF & less common EGFR mutations. The number of FDA-approved TKIs for driver mutations in NSCLC now includes five for EGFR, five for ALK, two for ROS1, two for NTRK, one for MET exon 14, and one for RET fusions. In addition, there is a major role for immune therapy, and for molecular diagnostic testing to help guide the selection of checkpoint inhibition therapy in the first-line setting for NSCLC patients without driver mutations. For all treatment-naïve NSCLC patients, proper molecular testing must be done on all patients before initial therapy begins in order to identify the specific driver mutation and corresponding optimal TKI therapy, or in the absence of such driver mutations, to facilitate the first-line use of optimal immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

Target Audience

The target audience includes both academic and community-based healthcare professionals, consisting of medical and radiation oncologists, oncology nurses, oncology pharmacists, oncology pathologists, pulmonologists, cytotechnologists, lung cancer researchers, oncology fellows, Advanced Nurse Practitioners in Oncology, Oncology Physician Assistants and other allied healthcare professionals (HCPs) involved in the diagnosis, treatment and care of NSCLC patients with actionable driver mutations.

Learning Objectives

Physician
  1. Devise molecular testing protocols for your institution or practice based upon established guidelines, to detect actionable driver mutations, including tissue agnostic markers and PD-L1 levels, in both treatment-naïve and previously-treated NSCLC patients, and, prepare corresponding treatment algorithms utilizing optimal targeted or immune therapies.
  2. Implement a long-term clinical plan to increase the use of molecular diagnostic testing according to established guidelines at your institution or practice, for NSCLC patients who are newly-diagnosed, and for NSCLC patients with disease progression.
  3. Compare and contrast the clinical applications of plasma NGS testing versus tissue-based NGS testing in NSCLC as guidelines for systemic therapies using TKIs and immune checkpoint inhibitors.
  4. Understand the advantages and limitations of different liquid biopsy analytes for NSCLC, including ctDNA, CTCs, CCfDNA, ccfRNA, and other platforms for detecting driver mutations and PD-L1 levels.
  5. Describe the rationale for the standards of care TKIs used for treating the established actionable driver mutations such as EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF and tissue agnostic patients with driver mutations such as NTRK.
  6. Evaluate the efficacy and safety using investigational agents and also investigational use of FDA-approved drugs for NSCLC patients with uncommon actionable driver mutations such as MET, RET, KRAS, HER2, Exon 20 and other uncommon EGFR Alterations.
Nurse
  1. Devise molecular testing protocols for your institution or practice based upon established guidelines, to detect actionable driver mutations, including tissue agnostic markers” and PD-L1 levels, in both treatment-naïve and previously-treated NSCLC patients, and, prepare corresponding treatment algorithms utilizing optimal targeted or immune therapies.
  2. Implement a long-term clinical plan to increase the use of molecular diagnostic testing according to established guidelines at your institution or practice, for NSCLC patients who are newly-diagnosed, and for NSCLC patients with disease progression.
  3. Compare and contrast the clinical applications of plasma NGS testing versus tissue-based NGS testing in NSCLC as guidelines for systemic therapies using TKIs and immune checkpoint inhibitors.
  4. Understand the advantages and limitations of different liquid biopsy analytes for NSCLC, including ctDNA, CTCs, CCfDNA, ccfRNA, and other platforms for detecting driver mutations and PD-L1 levels.
  5. Describe the rationale for the standards of care TKIs used for treating the established actionable driver mutations such as EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF and tissue agnostic patients with driver mutations such as NTRK.
  6. Evaluate the efficacy and safety using investigational agents and also “investigational use” of FDA-approved drugs for NSCLC patients with uncommon actionable driver mutations such as MET, RET, KRAS, HER2, Exon 20 and other uncommon EGFR Alterations.
Pharmacist
  1. Devise molecular testing protocols for your institution or practice based upon established guidelines, to detect actionable driver mutations, including tissue agnostic markers and PD-L1 levels, in both treatment-naïve and previously-treated NSCLC patients, and, prepare corresponding treatment algorithms utilizing optimal targeted or immune therapies.
  2. Implement a long-term clinical plan to increase the use of molecular diagnostic testing according to established guidelines at your institution or practice, for NSCLC patients who are newly-diagnosed, and for NSCLC patients with disease progression.
  3. Compare and contrast the clinical applications of plasma NGS testing versus tissue-based NGS testing in NSCLC as guidelines for systemic therapies using TKIs and immune checkpoint inhibitors.
  4. Understand the advantages and limitations of different liquid biopsy analytes for NSCLC, including ctDNA, CTCs, CCfDNA, ccfRNA, and other platforms for detecting driver mutations and PD-L1 levels.
  5. Describe the rationale for the standards of care TKIs used for treating the established actionable driver mutations such as EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF and tissue agnostic patients with driver mutations such as NTRK.
  6. Evaluate the efficacy and safety using investigational agents and also investigational use of FDA-approved drugs for NSCLC patients with uncommon actionable driver mutations such as MET, RET, KRAS, HER2, Exon 20 and other uncommon EGFR Alterations.

CME/CE Accreditation and Credit Designation

Physicians

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nurses

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 2 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Pharmacists

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-20-002-H01-P
Credits: 2 hours (0.2 ceu)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Other

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 2 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.

 

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to companies providing support for this independent educational activity.

Lilly
Novartis
Merck
Amgen