Cancer Education
focusing on Specialized Topics of Interest

Taught by the Experts

Symposium Co-Chairs

Paul A Bunn Jr MD
Paul A. Bunn, Jr., MD
Distinguished Professor
James Dudley Chair in Lung Cancer Research
Professor, Medical Oncology
University of Colorado Denver
Denver, CO
Roy S Herbst MD PhD
Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD
Ensign Professor of Medicine
Professor of Pharmacology
Chief of Medical Oncology
Director, Thoracic Oncology Research Program
Associate Director for Translational Research
Translational Research Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT
H. Jack West, MD
H. Jack West, MD
Medical Director
Thoracic Oncology Program
Swedish Cancer Institute
President and CEO
Global Resource for Advancing Cancer Education (GRACE)
Seattle, WA

Medical Oncology Faculty

Walter J. Curran, Jr., MD
Walter J. Curran, Jr., MD
Executive Director, Winship Cancer Institute
Associate Vice President, Cancer,
Woodruff Health Sciences Center
Lawrence W. Davis Professor and Chairman of Radiation Oncology
Group Chairman and Principal Investigator, NRG
Atlanta, GA
Edward B. Garon, MD
Edward B. Garon, MD
Associate Clinical Professor
Department of Medicine
Director, Thoracic Oncology Program
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center
Los Angeles, CA
Richard J. Gralla, MD, FACP
Richard J. Gralla, MD, FACP
Professor of Medicine
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Jacobi Medical Center
Bronx, New York
Ronald B. Natale, MD
Ronald B. Natale, MD
Director of the Lung Cancer Clinical Research Program
Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, CA
Joel Neal, MD, PhD
Joel Neal, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Division of Oncology
Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford Clinical Cancer Center
Stanford, CA
Greg Riely, MD
Greg Riely, MD
Medical Oncologist
Thoracic Oncology Service
Vice Chair, Clinical Trials Office
Department of Medicine
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
Deborah A. Wong, MD, PhD
Deborah A. Wong, MD, PhD
Professor, Oncology
Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center
UCLA Medical Center
Santa Monica, CA

Oncology Nursing Faculty

Marianne J. Davies, DNP, MSN, RN, APRN, CNS-BC, ACNP-BC, AOCNP
Marianne J. Davies, DNP, MSN, RN, APRN, CNS-BC, ACNP-BC, AOCNP
Clinical Instructor in Nursing
Thoracic Oncology Program
Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center
Yale Schools of Nursing and Medicine
New Haven, CT

Oncology Pharmacist Faculty

Jim M. Koeller, MS
Jim M. Koeller, MS
Professor,
University of Texas at Austin
College of Pharmacy,
Pharmacotherapy Division
Adjoint Professor
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
School of Medicine, Pharmacotherapy Education & Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
San Antonio, TX
A Multi-Disciplinary CME/CE Cancer Symposium in San Francisco, CA

For oncologists, hematologists, fellows, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, & other Healthcare Professionals

Agenda

Highly Enjoyable Learning Experience – All Clinical Case-Based Presentations
Participants Use Their Smart Phones or Tablets/Laptops to ask the Faculty
Questions, and to Answer Patient-Care Questions Throughout the Symposium
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7:00AM Registration and Full Buffet Breakfast
8:00AM Welcome, Introductions and CME/CE Pre Test
Dr. Bunn
SESSION #1: “INITIAL” Therapy for NONSQUAMOUS and SQUAMOUS NSCLC PATIENTS
8:15AM What are the options for initial therapy of NONSQUAMOUS NSCLC?
  • Current algorithms, new and emerging therapies
  • Targeting PD-1, PD-L1, (Stratifying by PD-L1 Expression) Targeting CTLA-4
  • Targeting EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF
  • Current and emerging various combinations of Immune & targeted therapies & chemotherapy
  • Chemotherapy monotherapy and in various combinations with Immune & targeted therapies
"Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • Are there potentially curable NSCLC patients with Immune therapy or Targeted Therapy or used in combinations in advanced NSCLC? Yes? No? Unsure?
Dr. Garon
8:30AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. Dr. Garon (Moderator)
8:45AM What are the therapeutic options for initial therapy of SQUAMOUS NSCLC? Which patients are candidates for the various options?
  • Current algorithms and new and emerging therapies
  • Targeting VEGFR2, PD-1, PD-L1, EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF
  • Current and emerging various combinations of Immune & targeted therapies & chemotherapy
  • Chemotherapy monotherapy and in various combinations with Immune & targeted therapies
"Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • I understand the standards of care for my treatment-naïve patients with advanced squamous NSCLC. Yes? No? Unsure?
Dr. Bunn
9:00AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. Dr. Bunn (Moderator)
SESSION #2: Therapy Options “AFTER” 1st-Line Therapy for NONSQUAMOUS and SQUAMOUS NSCLC Patients
9:15AM What are the standards of care options for second-line and subsequent lines of NSCLC therapy? What are these options? Which patients are candidates for these various options? And how are these therapies for relapsed NSCLC patients sequenced?
  • Chemotherapy
  • Targeting VEGFR2, PD-1, PD-L1, EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF
  • Other Targets?
"Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • I understand the standards of care for my patients with advanced squamous NSCLC in the relapsed setting and in subsequent lines of therapy. Yes? No? Unsure?
Dr. Natale
9:30AM DEBATE #1:Total Mutation Burden is a necessary clinical tool for managing NSCLC patients today.
  • YES (Dr. Herbst)
  • NO (Dr. Garon)
9:45AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. Dr. Herbst (Moderator)
10:00AM BREAK
SESSION #3: The New Therapeutic Landscapes for ALK-REARRANGEMENT & EGFR-POSITIVE for NSCLC Patients
10:15AM DEBATE #2: Should we use the most effective anti-ALK-directed therapy or anti-EGFR therapy "up front" or save it for relapse?
  • Use most effective agent "up front" (Dr. Bunn)
  • Save it for relapse (Dr. Herbst)
10:30AM ALK-NSCLC: 1st-Line Therapies and Sequencing Options: (1st, 2nd & 3rd-generation agents)
  • Should any of the FDA-approved anti-ALK targeted therapies be considered as The 1st-line standard of care?
  • What will be the impact of the emerging anti-ALK TKIs on the current treatment algorithm for treatment-naïve patients?
  • What are the strategies for intra-cranial disease control?
"Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • There is clearly one anti-ALK agent for as the standard of care for most ALK-rearrangement-positive NSCLC. Yes? No? Unsure?
Dr. Bunn
10:45AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. Dr. Bunn (Moderator)
11:00AM EGFR-NSCLC: 1st-Line Therapies and Sequencing Options: (1st, 2nd & 3rd-generation agents)
  • Should any of the EGFR-directed therapies be considered as The 1st-line standard of care?
  • What is the role for AR-mutation testing after patients relapse on up-front anti-EGFR therapy? And what is the test? and what is it looking for?
  • Should any patients with EGFR mutations receive immunotherapy? If Yes? Who? When?
  • What is the role for immune therapy in patients with EGFR mutations?
"Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • There is clearly one standard 1st-line anti-EGFR agent for EGFR-positive NSCLC. Yes? No? Unsure?
  • Should intra-cranial brain control be a factor involved in decisions for selecting an anti-EGFR TKI or ant-ALK TKI therapy? Yes? No? Unsure?
Dr. Riely
11:15AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. Dr. Riely (Moderator)
11:30AM Emerging Options in Managing CNS disease in NSCLC: The expanding role of systemic therapies Dr. West
11:45AM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. Dr. West (Moderator)
12:00PM LUNCH Managing Immune Therapy irAEs Dr. Davies
12:00PM LUNCH New Physician Reimbursement Dr. Koeller
12:00PM LUNCH Integrating QI into Community Oncology Practices for Lung Cancer Dr. Gralla
SESSION #4: Molecular Oncology BEYOND EGFR and ALK in NSCLC - Optimal Therapies - Diagnostic Testing
1:00PM DEBATE #3: Should a medical oncologist delay therapy for a treatment-naïve NSCLC patient with either an EGFR, ROS-1 mutation or an ALK-re-arrangement while waiting for NGS testing results? "Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • Should NGS testing be done for all newly diagnosed lung cancer patients? Yes? No? Unsure?
  • Are there potential downside risks/harms for routine NGS testing? Yes? No? Unsure?
  • Should NGS testing become integrated into overall testing for decision making on therapy” Yes? No? Unsure?
  • YES (wait for NGS test results before initiating therapy) (P. Bunn)
  • NO (treat without delay for the known driver mutation (EGFR, ROS-1, or ALK) (H. West)
1:15PM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. P. Bunn (Moderator)
1:30PM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
Molecular Testing for NSCLC Patients: Where are we today? What’s Coming?
  • Broader FDA-approved NGS testing
  • PD-L1 testing
  • Liquid biopsy testing
  • Predictive biomarkers and other immune therapy
P. Bunn & Panel
2:05PM Treatment Options for Rarer NSCLC Mutations: Maximizing Targeted Therapy Opportunities
  • How does Broader FDA-approved NGS testing change what medical oncologists treating lung cancer are doing as standards of care?
  • What NSCLC molecular targets are most clearly relevant beyond EGFR, ALK and ROS1?
"Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • Should immune therapies be considered as options alone or in combinations after progression on a targeted therapy or on standard chemotherapy for a patient with a driver mutation? Yes? No? Unsure?
  • Should all treatment naïve NSCLC patients be tested for PD-L1 expression? Yes? No? Unsure?
Dr. Neal
2:20PM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions.
2:40PM BREAK
SESSION #5: Strategies for Early-Stage NSCLC - SCLC - Head & Neck Cancer
3:00PM Early-Stage NSCLC
  • FDA-Approved anti-PD-L1 Mab for Stage III NSCLC
  • Are there potentially curable Stage III NSCLC patients treated with either Checkpoint Inhibition or Targeted Therapy?
  • Other anti-PD-L1 and PD-1 MAbs for Stage III NSCLC
  • What is the role of anti-PD-L1 and PD-1 MAbs for Stages I and II NSCLC?
"Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • Are all anti-PD-L1 and PD-1 MAbs the new standard of care for Stage III NSCLC? Yes? No? Unsure?
  • Should anti-PD-L1 and PD-1 MAbs be used for Stage I and/or II NSCLC?
  • Are there potentially curable Stage III NSCLC patients treated with either Checkpoint Inhibition or Targeted Therapy? Yes? No? Unsure?
Dr. Neal
3:15PM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. Moderator
3:30PM Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC): New Advances with Systemic Therapy
  • Treatment-Naïve and Relapsed Patients
  • Targeted Therapies
  • Chemotherapy
  • Immune Therapies
Dr. Natale
3:45PM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions. Dr. Natale (Moderator)
4:00PM Radiation Therapy: New and Emerging Strategies for NSCLC
  • How should radiation be used with Checkpoint Inhibition for NSCLC patients?
  • What strategies should be used after chemo-radiation for Early-Stage NSCLC?
  • New strategies using radiation in the treatment of Stage IV NSCLC
  • New strategies using radiation for brain metastases
Dr. Curran
4:20PM Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head & Neck (SCCHN) New Advances with Checkpoint Inhibition-Based Strategies
  • For patients with progression on platinum-based therapy only?
  • Is there a role in up front therapy for Checkpoint Inhibition?
"Rapid-Fire" Questions for the Audience
  • I use Checkpoint Inhibition for initial therapy of my patients with Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head & Neck
Dr. Wong
4:40PM Expert Panel Discussion and Audience Q & A
The expert panel answers the queued-up audience questions submitted via their iPads or their other "smart devices" & from floor microphones, and also engages in a lively exchange of opinions.
4:55PM CME/CE Post Test
5:00PM Adjourn

Overview

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CASE-BASED LEARNING

This is a one-day CME/CE symposium on the treatment and management of patients with lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The focus is on community-based medical oncology practices, but all clinicians caring for lung cancer patients are invited, including academic and research-based oncologists, pathologists and allied healthcare practitioners including nurses, nurse practitioners and pharmacists.

The primary objective is to provide the target audience with the practical knowledge and best clinical practices to help them improve outcome in their lung cancer and head and neck cancer patients through a focus on personalized medicine with molecular and genomic testing and biomarkers, especially today with the wider availability of NGS testing. This symposium will integrate many new and emerging therapies into best practices for their lung cancer and head and neck cancer patients including immune therapy, novel targeted therapies, and novel uses of chemotherapy in various combinations with immune therapies. The focus is on community-based practices, but all clinicians are targeted, including academic and research-based oncologists and allied healthcare professionals. The target audience includes lung cancer and head and neck cancer medical oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, surgeons, fellows, oncology pharmacists, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and other allied healthcare professionals.

On behalf of the world-class faculty of expert lung cancer and head and neck cancer medical oncologists, an Advanced Nurse Practitioner, and a Professor of Pharmacy, we are very pleased to invite you to attend the forthcoming one-day, multi-disciplinary CME/CE program: the 11th Annual Symposium on Personalized Therapies and Best Clinical Practices for Lung Cancer and head and neck cancer. This is THE thoracic cancer symposium to attend in 2017. The symposium will present practical information that is relevant to academic and community practices, presented in case-based learning by thoracic cancer experts. During 8.25 hours on Saturday, October 27, 2018 it will provide the precise summarized information you need to be up-to-date on how to treat your thoracic cancer patients to improve their outcomes.

Participants will enjoy a highly interactive educational program. Real-life patient cases are used throughout the day addressing the application of new clinical strategies with personalized medicine for lung cancer.

Using iPads or other smart devices provided at the symposium, participants will make patient management and treatment decisions involving clinical cases presented by the expert lung cancer faculty.

Participants will also use their personal iPads,Tablets, smart phones and other Wi-Fi-enabled devices including laptops to "answer yes or no" to rapid-fire questions on key topics addressing unmet medical needs; to vote on several lively debates addressing new and emerging clinical strategies. During the past year a large amount of new information addressing the unmet medical needs of lung cancer and head and neck cancer patients has been published or made available in the public domain. This includes novel therapies and new and emerging standards of care. Strategies involving best clinical practices with personalized medicine are the focus of this symposium. And the timing of this program is designed to provide the participants with the most important clinical and scientific data of the year following the World Lung Cancer Congress in Toronto, ESMO and ASCO. This material presented is the most up-to-date possible to help HCPs close Practice Gaps for improving their patients’ outcomes.

Now in its 11th consecutive year, this symposium provides a one-day update on the latest developments in the care and management of lung cancer and head and neck cancer patients. Up to 8.25 hours of CME/CE credit can be earned.

Bring your own Smartphones, Tablets, or Laptops
(iPad, Android, iPhone, etc.): This will enable participants to use their personal "smart devices" during the symposium to ask and answer all questions of the faculty. Participants will connect to our private Wi-Fi network in the symposium room on October 27, 2018. All participants and all faculty will see the same questions and answers on their personal smart devices.

 

Educational Need

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The educational need for this symposium on lung cancer and head and neck cancer is the result of recent and continuing FDA approvals and soon to emerge FDA approvals on new immune therapies, new targeted therapies as well as for a large number combinations of immune therapies with chemotherapies for thoracic malignancies. It is essential that this new data and corresponding clinical applications be integrated into the current standards of care. And the timing of this October 27, 2018 symposium, occurring immediately following the World Lung Cancer Meeting in Toronto and the ESMO Meeting in Europe greatly facilitates the education of clinicians treating lung cancer.

With an understanding of the most current clinical trials’ data and FDA indications involving immune and targeted therapies, it will be possible for HCPs to deliver optimal patient care for many malignancies, resulting in improved outcome.

UNMET MEDICAL NEED

In recent years, ongoing major therapeutic advances in treating lung cancer and head and neck cancer, especially with newer immune therapies and novel target therapies and various combinations with chemotherapy have been emerging and entering into standards of care. Nevertheless, the majority of patients with thoracic malignancies die from their cancer.

In 2018, lung cancer will again be the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US, remains a significant unmet medical need, and, is expected to be a major clinical and scientific challenge for the foreseeable future. Head and neck cancer is the fourth largest malignancy. According to the American Cancer Society Facts and Figures there were an estimated 230,000 new cases, and 170,000 deaths from lung cancer this in 2017. Survival rates for patients with lung cancer vary widely depending upon the stage of the lung malignancy when it is initially diagnosed. The five-year survival rate for Stage I NSCLC is approximately 50 percent. Perhaps more importantly, because most lung cancer are diagnosed at late stages of disease, especially Stages II and mostly IV, the five-year survival rate for Stage IV NSCLC is approximately two percent. Thus, it is clear that there is incredible opportunity for improving outcomes for patients with lung cancer.

Despite the overall poor outcome, lung cancer patient outcomes are improving. Patients are living longer and with a better quality of life because physicians and other healthcare professionals have access to the information to gain the knowledge and competence to treat, care for and manage their patients. Physicians have a better understanding of lung cancer and head and neck cancer cell biology, an increasing ability to personalize existing and emerging systemic anti-cancer drug therapy because of molecular and genomic diagnostic tests, especially the wider usage today of NGS testing, the availability to use next-generation systemic lung and head and neck cancer therapy and expanded uses of many existing systemic therapies.

This October 27, 2018 symposium will be yet another step towards addressing the overall unmet medical need of these patients.


Target Audience

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This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of and help close the quality clinical performance practice gaps of medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, physician assistants, oncology pharmacists, oncology nurses/Nurse Practitioners and other allied health-care professionals involved in the treatment, care and management of patients with lung cancer and Head & Neck Cancer, including physician assistants, fellows and other HCPs. Lung cancer and Head & Neck cancer are both treated optimally by a multi-disciplinary approach of clinicians and, thus, all of the aforementioned clinician specialties are targeted for invitation to this CME/CE activity for personalized therapies and best clinical practices.


Learning Objectives

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Physicians

  1. Understand how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  2. Evaluate when to order NGS testing for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC, especially for those patients with EGFR mutations, or with ALK or ROS1 rearrangements.
  3. Compare and contrast the options for treating relapsed patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  4. Evaluate how to apply the different various approved and emerging immune therapy monotherapy and combination strategies for NSCLC patients in both the treatment naïve and salvage settings.
  5. Compare and contrast the various immune therapy and chemotherapy options in treatment-naïve NSCLC without driver mutations in patients with high, low or no expression of PD-L1.
  6. Evaluate the scenarios for when, if ever, to temporarily discontinue, and when to resume immune therapy in a NSCLC patient that is responding to therapy.
  7. Evaluate the large number of open clinical trials offering various combinations of immune and targeted therapies for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Head & Neck Cancer as possible options for enrolling eligible patients to possibly improve outcome.
  8. Compare and contrast the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an EGFR-directed therapy across all lines of therapy.
  9. Compare and contrast the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an ALK-directed therapy across all lines of therapy.
  10. Understand how to apply the various sequencing strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR and anti-ALK therapy, including when to use the most effective of the three generations of EGFR-directed and ALK-directed TKI therapies “up front” versus saving them for salvage therapy.
  11. Analyze the various predictive and prognostic markers including PD-L1, Tumor Mutation Burden (TMB) and smoking history for patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  12. Evaluate the pros and cons of using Stereotactic Ablation Body Radiation (SABR) as an equivalent alternative standard of care to surgery for Stage I NSCLC patients.
  13. Understand the pros and cons of prophylactic cranial irradiation in NSCLC considering the advances with TKIs and other systemic therapy.
  14. Compare and contrast the new FDA-approved and emerging immune therapies and combinations for squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.
  15. Compare and contrast the emerging options for treating patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  16. Evaluate the opportunities to address and improve priorities for the National Quality Strategy and Quality Improvement.

Nurses

  1. Recall how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  2. Describe when to order NGS testing for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC, especially for those patients with EGFR mutations, or with ALK or ROS1 rearrangements.
  3. List the options for treating relapsed patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  4. Review how to apply the different various approved and emerging immune therapy monotherapy and combination strategies for NSCLC patients in both the treatment naïve and salvage settings.
  5. Define the various immune therapy and chemotherapy options in treatment-naïve NSCLC without driver mutations in patients with high, low or no expression of PD-L1.
  6. Describe the scenarios for when, if ever, to temporarily discontinue, and when to resume immune therapy in a NSCLC patient that is responding to therapy.
  7. Identify the large number of open clinical trials offering various combinations of immune and targeted therapies for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Head & Neck Cancer as possible options for enrolling eligible patients to possibly improve outcome.
  8. Recall the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an EGFR-directed therapy across all lines of therapy.
  9. Recall the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an ALK-directed therapy across all lines of therapy.
  10. Review how to apply the various sequencing strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR and anti-ALK therapy, including when to use the most effective of the three generations of EGFR-directed and ALK-directed TKI therapies “up front” versus saving them for salvage therapy.
  11. Describe the various predictive and prognostic markers including PD-L1, Tumor Mutation Burden (TMB) and smoking history for patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  12. List the pros and cons of using Stereotactic Ablation Body Radiation (SABR) as an equivalent alternative standard of care to surgery for stage I NSCLC patients.
  13. List the pros and cons of prophylactic cranial irradiation in NSCLC considering the advances with TKIs and other systemic therapy.
  14. Recall the new FDA-approved and emerging immune therapies and combinations for squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.
  15. Review the emerging options for treating patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer
  16. Recall the opportunities to address and improve priorities for the National Quality Strategy and Quality Improvement.

Pharmacists

  1. Recall how to select from among all options to provide the optimal therapy for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  2. Describe when to order NGS testing for treatment-naïve patients with nonsquamous or squamous NSCLC, especially for those patients with EGFR mutations, or with ALK or ROS1 rearrangements.
  3. List the options for treating relapsed patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  4. Review how to apply the different various approved and emerging immune therapy monotherapy and combination strategies for NSCLC patients in both the treatment naïve and salvage settings.
  5. Define the various immune therapy and chemotherapy options in treatment-naïve NSCLC without driver mutations in patients with high, low or no expression of PD-L1.
  6. Describe the scenarios for when, if ever, to temporarily discontinue, and when to resume immune therapy in a NSCLC patient that is responding to therapy.
  7. Identify the large number of open clinical trials offering various combinations of immune and targeted therapies for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Head & Neck Cancer as possible options for enrolling eligible patients to possibly improve outcome.
  8. Recall the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an EGFR-directed therapy across all lines of therapy.
  9. Recall the increasing number of options for treating NSCLC patients with an ALK-directed therapy across all lines of therapy.
  10. Review how to apply the various sequencing strategies for managing acquired resistance to anti-EGFR and anti-ALK therapy, including when to use the most effective of the three generations of EGFR-directed and ALK-directed TKI therapies “up front” versus saving them for salvage therapy.
  11. Describe the various predictive and prognostic markers including PD-L1, Tumor Mutation Burden (TMB) and smoking history for patients with nonsquamous or squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.
  12. List the pros and cons of using Stereotactic Ablation Body Radiation (SABR) as an equivalent alternative standard of care to surgery for stage I NSCLC patients.
  13. List the pros and cons of prophylactic cranial irradiation in NSCLC considering the advances with TKIs and other systemic therapy.
  14. Recall the new FDA-approved and emerging immune therapies and combinations for squamous cell Head & Neck cancer.
  15. Review the emerging options for treating patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer
  16. Recall the opportunities to address and improve priorities for the National Quality Strategy and Quality Improvement.

CME/CE Accreditation and Credit Designation

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Physicians

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this live activity for a maximum of 8.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Pharmacists

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

UAN: 0838-0000-18-001-L01-P
Credits: 8.25 hours (0.825 ceu)
Type of Activity: Knowledge

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Nurses

The BioMedical Learning Institute is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The BioMedical Learning Institute designates this educational activity for 8.25 contact hours.

Accreditation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation refers to recognition of educational activities and does not imply approval or endorsement of any product.

To receive CE contact hour credit, attendance at the entire activity and the successful completion of the post‐test and evaluation form is required.

Other

Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of attendance for educational activities certified for Category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician Assistants may receive a maximum of 8.25 hours of Category 1 credit for attending this symposium.

Fellows will receive a certificate of attendance that they can submit to their accrediting organizations for continuing education credit.


Location of this Symposium

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San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront
1800 Old Bayshore Highway
Burlingame, California 94010
(650) 692-9100

The discounted room rate of $168 will expire on October 4, 2018.

Click here to reserve your hotel sleeping room online

Exhibit Information

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There is an opportunity to exhibit at this symposium. Please send an email to exhibits@bmli.com for more information or call 214-269-2014

EXHIBIT FEES:

  • The fee for a 6-foot tabletop display and 2 discounted registrations for symposium and all meals is $3,999.
  • The fee for a 6-foot tabletop display and 3 discounted registrations for symposium and all meals is $4,999.
  • The fee for 2 6-foot tabletop displays and 2 discounted registrations for symposium and all meals is $5,999.
  • The fee for 2 6-foot tabletop displays and 3 discounted registrations for symposium and all meals is $6,999.

Educational Support

Sincere appreciation is extended to companies providing support for this independent educational activity.

Merck
Genentech
AstraZeneca
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Celgene
Loxo Oncology
Foundation Medicine
2018
Additional company support pending

Previous Supporters
Astellas
AstraZeneca
Boehringer Ingelheim
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Celgene
Foundation Medicine
Genentech
Helsinn
Lilly
Merck
Myriad Genetics
Novartis
Pfizer
Takeda Oncology
Table of Contents
Educational Partners